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Ono "I'm Not Getting Enough"

About.com Rating 3.5 Star Rating

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Ono

Ono - I'm Not Getting Enough

Mindtrain/Twisted

"I'm Not Getting Enough" is Yoko Ono's latest attempt at breaking her own record of being the oldest woman ever to have a #1 on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play Chart. As always, an impressive number of remixers are involved in this project: Eddie Amador, Morgan Page, Zoned Out, Craig C & Nique, Double B, Ralphi Rosario, and last but not least, Dave Audé, who also rerecorded the vocals for these mixes with Deanna DellaCioppia singing backup.

The song is a lot more mainstream than many of Yoko's previous tracks, such as "Give Peace A Chance" and "No, No, No." Instead of relying on her trademarked bizarre moans and chanting, she actually sings smoothly. What makes most of the ONO remixes interesting to me is to see how each producer deals with what is certainly a very unusual project. This song, however, suggested to the remixers a more mainstream approach.

Not Getting Enough Remixes

Morgan Page's remix is certainly my favorite of the bunch. He does his usual club-friendly but somewhat restrained sound here, and uses just the right effects to make even Yoko's singing sound great.

The Zoned Out mix has a more electro vibe than any of the others, and also uses vocoders quite effectively. It has a lot in common with the Morgan Page mix. This mix is overall excellent, but it's less musical than Morgan's.

Eddie Amador delivered two mixes: a "Club Mix" with a disco house vibe, and a "Space Transmission Vocal" mix with a more minimal, tech house vibe. The "Club Mix" works very well, providing catchy riffs, nice pianos and funky guitars that compliment the song well. The "Space Transmission" mix has a lot of interesting elements to it, but as a whole, it all clashes, especially when her vocals come in. Unfortunately, both of these mixes are quite overcompressed.

The Craig C & Nique mix is interesting; there's always a lot going on. It kicks off immediately with chunky tribal drums and builds into some blaring synth rhythms and spacey pads. This mix, similar to the Amador mixes, is overcompressed.

Dave Audé's mix reminds me of his Claude LeGache mix of "You're The One." The synths and overall vibe are similar, but this is more mainstream. This is by far the catchiest of the mixes and is not to be overlooked. Some of the non-Yoko fans may appreciate this one.

Ralphi Rosario delivers exactly what you'd expect from him. It's a tiny bit more electro than the average Ralphi mix. There is also a Ralphi Part Two mix, which is quite similar to the first. It's a matter of choice, but personally I prefer part two - I find it a bit more melodic than part one.

Summary

All things considered, this package contains quite a few nice and interesting mixes. However, it isn't anywhere near as original and groundbreaking as any of ONO's previous efforts.

Released June 2009 on Mindtrain/Twisted Records

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